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Nov. 2009
April 28,2015   By:Chinahumanrights.org

Nov. 2, 2009

The second Beijing Forum on Human Rights opened in Beijing on November 2, 2009, with "Harmonious Development and Human Rights" as its main theme. Scholars from over 26 countries attended the event.

Luo Haocai, president of the China Society for Human Rights Studies, and Wang Chen, Minister of the State Council Information Office, delivered speeches in the opening ceremony.

Luo said human rights have made rapid progress over the past 30 years since China's reform and opening-up, and China will continue to contribute to the international cause of human rights. China is ready to work together with the international community to establish a harmonious world, he added. The forum lasted two days.

Wang said having full human rights and realizing a harmonious development has long been the pursuit of people all over the world, and it is a long-term historical mission of the Chinese people.

Nov. 8, 2009

A charity fund was set up to aid patients with Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), often known as brittle bone disease.

The fund, "China-Dolls care and Support Association", launched by the China Social Welfare Education Foundation (CSWEF), will focus on improving public knowledge of OI and other rare diseases, and providing social and legal assistance to patients and their families

The CSWEF said it had earmarked 100,000 yuan (14,000 U.S. dollars) to the fund and welcomed donations from various sectors.

Nov. 9, 2009

Detainees awaiting trial will no longer be forced to work at China's detention houses, thanks to a breakthrough being heralded by lawyers as legal progress in protecting their legitimate rights.

The change is outlined in a draft regulation published on the central government's website (gov.cn).

The seven-article regulation with 39 clauses was drafted by the Ministry of Public Security and released by the Legislative Affairs Office of the State Council, the country's cabinet.

The regulation stipulates that detention houses, where presumed-innocent people are held prior to their court proceedings, must safeguard the legitimate rights and interests of detainees.

The changes seek to better regulate the management of detention houses in general, which have long been accused of ignoring the legal rights of detainees.

Under the draft regulation, inmates will also be spared the task of having to supervise other detainees

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